About Yoga Stops Traffick | About Odanadi | About Human Trafficking

A one-day global yoga event created to raise awareness of and funds for the anti-trafficking organisation Odanadi Seva Trust. Find out how to take part.

One day, one voice

Yoga Stops Traffick was set up in 2010 by a group of volunteers who wanted to do something to help. On March 12th 2011 our 2nd annual event, was led by a group of young Odanadi residents from the entrance gates of the iconic Mysore Palace, many of whom are survivors of slavery, domestic abuse and forced prostitution. Through the common language of yoga, 3,000 people around the world united in support of Odanadi’s work and rolled out their mats in homes, beaches and mountaintops on the same day. From the home of Ashtanga in Mysore, a worldwide event was born.

Ashtanga Yoga is of huge significance to the young people of Odanadi. As part of their rehabilitation program, it has allowed them to reclaim their bodies; build physical and mental strength, and restore a sense of peace, confidence and self-worth.

By standing alongside them, you will be demonstrating your solidarity and support for them, as well as sending a message of defiance against a world which allows these horrific abuses to take place.

Now is your chance to make a difference, take part in Yoga Stops Traffick.

About Odanadi Seva Trust

Odanadi is a pioneering anti-trafficking organisation based in Mysore, South India, works for the rescue, rehabilitation and reintegration of trafficked women and children. For the past 20 years Odanadi has been committed to providing a safe haven for survivors of human trafficking, sexual exploitation, slavery, domestic abuse and destitution.

Rescue, rehabilitation and reintegration

Odanadi currently runs two residential rehabilitation and reintegration centres in Mysore, housing up to 85 women and young people at any one time. Every resident has a different story to tell: many have been rescued from the hands of brothel owners and sex traffickers, others from abusive homes, child marriages or domestic and commercial servitude. At Odanadi residents are provided with the skills they need to heal, empower, educate and eventually reintegrate themselves back into mainstream society.

Odanadi’s unique psycho-social therapy programme has become accepted as best practice both within India and internationally. The Union Human Resource Development Ministry has adopted the Odanadi model, and many other Indian state governments have sent rescued girls to Odanadi to facilitate their rehabilitation.

Odanadi’s method is carefully tailored according to each individual’s needs and can entail a wide range of activities, from psychological counseling to art therapy, drama, karate to yoga and acupuncture. Research shows that almost a quarter of trafficking victims are re-trafficked, which is why it is so important for residents to be well prepared for life outside the walls of Odanadi. Odanadi’s aim is to reunite trafficking victims with their families and to give them the necessary tools to face mainstream society as strong, confident, empowered individuals.

To find out here how the money raised from Yoga Stops Traffick will be spent visit odanadi.org

Human trafficking statistics

An estimated 2.5 million people globally are in forced labour at any given time as a result of trafficking, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, generating £20 billion per year.

In 2012 women accounted for 55-60 percent of all trafficking victims detected globally; children accounted for 27 percent –- a 7 percent increase from the period 2003-2006.

Sexual exploitation is the most common cause of human trafficking (79%), followed by forced labour (18%).

UNICEF estimates that globally, up to two million children are exploited in the commercial sex trade.